Black History—The Louisiana Rebellion of 1811

1811: Louisiana’s Heroic Slave Revolt

By Leon A. Waters

One of the most suppressed and hidden stories of African and African American history is the story of the 1811 Slave Revolt. The aim of the revolt was the establishment of an independent republic, a Black republic. Over 500 Africans, from 50 different nations with 50 different languages, would wage a fight against U.S. troops and the territorial militias.

This revolt would get started in St. John the Baptist and St. Charles parishes, about 30 miles upriver from New Orleans. At that time, New Orleans was the capital of what was called the Orleans Territory. The revolt sought to capture the city of New Orleans and make New Orleans the capital of the new republic…

Charles Deslondes, main leader of the uprising

16 thoughts on “Black History—The Louisiana Rebellion of 1811

  1. This is very interesting. I have not heard of this, which doesn’t; surprise me! When I fist visited the States (Deep South) in 1966 – coming from Europe I was shocked at what I found with regards to racial segregation. It’s good to learn more…thank. you:)

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Irrational racist sentiment is too often handed down generation to generation, regardless of color or creed. If it’s deliberate, it’s something I strongly feel amounts to a form of child abuse: to rear one’s impressionably very young children in an environment of overt bigotry — especially against other races and/or sub-racial groups (i.e. ethnicities). Not only does it fail to prepare children for the practical reality of an increasingly racially/ethnically diverse and populous society and workplace, it also makes it so much less likely those children will be emotionally content or (preferably) harmonious with their multicultural/-racial surroundings.

      Children reared into their adolescence and, eventually, young adulthood this way can often be angry yet not fully realize at precisely what. Then they may feel left with little choice but to move to another part of the land, where their race or ethnicity predominates, preferably overwhelmingly so. If not for themselves, parents then should do their young children a big favor and NOT pass down onto their very impressionable offspring racially/ethnically bigoted feelings and perceptions, nor implicit stereotypes and ‘humor’, for that matter. Ironically, such rearing can make life much harder for one’s own children. …

      One means of proactively preventing this social/societal problem may be by allowing young children to become accustomed to other races in a harmoniously positive manner. The early years are typically the best time to instill and even solidify positive social-interaction life skills/traits, like interracial harmonization, into a very young brain. Human infancy is the prime (if not the only) time to instill and even solidify positive social-interaction characteristics into a very young mind.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. “If it’s deliberate, it’s something I strongly feel amounts to a form of child abuse: to rear one’s impressionably very young children in an environment of overt bigotry — especially against other races and/or sub-racial groups (i.e. ethnicities). Not only does it fail to prepare children for the practical reality of an increasingly racially/ethnically diverse and populous society and workplace, it also makes it so much less likely those children will be emotionally content or (preferably) harmonious with their multicultural/-racial surroundings…”

        This right here, this passage needs to be explore more. Amazing insight.

        Liked by 2 people

      2. Yes. And with racism and bigotry being generationally acquired during early-life exposure, the primary means of progressive change is likely through primary school curriculum, perhaps like Critical Race Theory (although I’m not familiar with its specific content).

        Liked by 2 people

  2. I’d not heard about this one, either! You always read of the consequences of the Veezey Rebellion, from The Islands, as we called them, of SC, in 1822, and the tightening of Black Codes as a result all across the old South, i.e. VA, GA, SC, and the followers, MD, NC, etc down to the deep South, and how the Harper’s Ferry attack terrified whites in VA and MD, but this one was earlier, and apparently more well-planned, even! I’m surprised, but not surprised, that it was kept so secret.

    Thank you for this information, and thanks I guess to Howard Zinn’s project as well, and thank you for reminding us that tools and creating new tools requires knowing our history well enough to learn from it.
    Stay safe,
    Shira

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Right on and you’re correct. I haven’t heard about this either but I heard a long time ago that there was a lot of slave revolts that occurred. Not just the famous one by Nat Turner.

      No worries and thank you. I will be presenting other tidbits from black history that are seldom spoken about. I won’t do any write ups but the material from these great minds have done the work for me ☺️

      Well, and they have enormous expertise on the subjects.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. After watching the original release of the 1977 TV miniseries ‘Roots’ at age 10, I can recall how bewildered I’d get just by the concept of Black people being brutalized and told they were not welcome — while they, as a people, had been violently forced to the U.S. from their African home as slaves! And, as a people, there has been little or no reparations or real refuge for them here, since. In Toni Morrison’s novel Beloved, the narrator notes that, like the South, the Civil War era northern states also hated Black people but happened to hate slavery more.

    After 35 years of news consumption, I have found it astonishingly atrocious that such a large number of human beings, however precious their souls, can be considered thus treated as though disposable, even to an otherwise free, democratic and relatively civilized nation. When they take note of this, tragically, they’re vulnerable to begin subconsciously perceiving themselves as beings without value. (One can also observe this with the many Canadian indigenous children having been buried in unmarked graves.)

    Though perhaps subconsciously, a somewhat similar inhuman(e) devaluation is observable in external attitudes toward the daily civilian lives lost in protractedly devastating war zones and famine-stricken nations; the worth of such life will be measured by its overabundance and/or the protracted conditions under which it suffers. Thus, those people can eventually receive meagre column inches on the back page of the First World’s daily news.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Similar revolts occurred in the British Caribbean in the first quarter of the 19th century, yet led to the peaceful abolition of slavery (the plantation owners also threatened to rebel and join the US, which would probably have been suicidal given Black anger, the strength of the Royal Navy and the presence of British army garrisons).

    I’ve visited the Deep South once, a year or two before 9/11, and in Georgia at least, there were big signs of progress. The Savannah fire brigade (out clearing up after a hurricane) was about 50% Black and Black and White were mucking in together. Same at some commercial premises where the staff were out dealing with a big delivery. A lot still to do, though.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. True. A bunch of them happened in the islands. The Brits ended slavery way before the US but they were just as brutal.

      My parents are from Louisiana and I been to Savannah before. I have family in Atlanta and there has been progress. Old habits, traditions die slowly but hopefully the next generations will continue to process it eliminating the “old south.”

      Unfortunately institutional racism is still apparent and with the battle of classism this struggle with cont in the foreseeable future.

      Like

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